Bird Walks

All Wild Bird Unlimited Bird Walks are currently cancelled until further notice. We will post our bird walks here if we are able to resume them. If you would like to explore birding further on your own in the interim, here are some of our suggested resources

Our favorite and most frequent and relevant resource remains eBird, which is a free app for your phone, tablet, and computer that allows you to keep a life list of the birds you see throughout the region or the world.

Whether you like to bird alone,  or with others, you should be able to connect locally through Burroughs Audubon Society. We highly encourage attending any of the walks ,Many eyes and ears makes for more successful birding, you are advised of new locations and learn from others. It is always a good idea to call ahead where possible to ensure accessibility. 

If you are just starting out the Overland Park Arboretum has a bird blind surrounded by bird feeders off one of their trails. This gives you up close views of many of our local seasonal yard birds. https://www.opkansas.org/recreation-fun/arboretum-botanical-gardens/hiking-trails-prairie/

Powell Gardens also has a bird watching area. https://powellgardens.org/winter-birds/ , as well as a number of areas to bird. http://greatmissouribirdingtrail.com/Wordpress/birding-trails/kansas-city/index-kansas-city-birding-trail/powell-gardens/

Burroughs puts out a list of planned events on this page: http://burroughs.org/its-free/field-trips-programs    

Excellent list of bird hot spots and birds seen here: http://www.kcbirdingwalks.com/htdocs/Kansas%20City%20Area%20Bird%20List.html

Kansas Birding on Facebook is a timely resource as well. If you are on Facebook, request to join the group to stay updated.
KC and NE Kansas Birding is a Facebook group focused primarily on area field trips for birding.

http://www.ksbirds.org/ is a great local Kansas regional resource.
https://mobirds.org/ is for the Missouri birders.

KState Research and Extension http://www.gearycountyextension.com/NRMW.htm

Below is another resource that you can subscribe to. It is very timely and informative. This is available both for KS and MO and provides timely information while offering the opportunity to ask questions and engage in conversation about birds and birding in either state. (MO link below)
https://listserv.ksu.edu/cgi-bin?SUBED1=KSBIRD-L&A=1

And if you are looking for larger scale places a bit further afield, this is a resource list of what Kansas has to offer.
https://www.audubon.org/news/birding-kansas

Since we are in proximity to the MO side as well, we have also included some MO resources.
https://po.missouri.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=MOBIRDS-L&A=1
http://greatmissouribirdingtrail.com/Wordpress/
https://www.audubon.org/news/birding-missouri
https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/activities/birdwatching

 Burroughs Audubon Society birdwalks and events:

You can find many more bird walks and nature-oriented activities and events at this link:  Burroughs Audubon Society field trips.  

 Check their website for details and availability.  

 Jayhawk Audubon Society https://www.jayhawkaudubon.org/seed-sale

 Backyard Bird Center in KC Missouri has weekly bird walks that vary in locations in peak migration seasons. Check their calendars for details and sign ups. 

  Loess Bluffs Wildlife Refuge 

This special area just North of the the Kansas City Metro area is a valuable refuge and breeding ground for migratory birds and wildlife. An easy day trip and primarily driving tour. In December they are a fantastic place to see as up to hundreds of Bald Eagles and thousands of Snow Geese. Check their weekly counts above. 

Quivira Wildlife Refuge

Quivira National Wildlife Refuge is further afield in South Central Kansas, and is a rare inland salt marsh with sand prairie. lt lies in the transition zone of eastern and western prairies and provides vital habitat for migratory waterfowl in the Central Flyway. It is one of the few places where the Endangered Whooping Crane, one of North Americas rarest birds can be seen during their spring and fall migrations, along with many many other shorebirds and waterfowl.